High School Golf Try-outs

High School Golf Try-outs

My father and grandparents have always been very interested in the game of golf.  When I was seven, my dad bought me my first set of golf clubs.  Every day that he came home from work early or had off, he would take me golfing on a small course known as Mill Road.  I really enjoyed golf, so my dad paid for two weeks of lessons at a normal size course.

During my lessons, I played well for my age, but was not willing to listen to the teaching pro’s swing suggestions because I liked my swing the way it was.  After those lessons, I played golf very little and pursued soccer.

Again at age twelve, I started playing golf.  This time, I wanted to continue playing, so my dad bought me a good set of normal size golf clubs.  I continued playing throughout my freshman year in high school and over that summer.  I decided to try out for the Junior Varsity Golf Team before tenth grade.  I was not well prepared because I had played only a few times up until try outs.  I played well enough and made the team anyways.  By my junior year in high school, I was the team captain.  Having used up my three years of Junior Varsity eligibility, in order to play in my senior year, I would have to make the Varsity team, so I started practicing religiously right away.

Throughout my junior year and over the following summer, I practiced every possible day.  I would come home from school, do homework right away, and then go outside to pitch, chip, and putt for two hours.  Also, I went to the driving range once a week and to the course to play twice a week.

When try outs rolled around, I was feeling very confident and was ready to play and make the team.  When I got to the try out, I was extremely nervous and questioned my ability and whether or not I would make the team.  I started losing confidence the more I thought about not making it.  As it turns out, I played terribly, shooting in the low nineties on both days.  This was a devastating ten strokes over my summer average and caused me to miss the cut.  To make matters worse, my friend whom I had played with many times over the summer made the team instead of me.  I had envisioned him and I playing on the team together, not just him making it.  When the coach said that I did not make the team, I was mad at myself and very disappointed with my performance.  I went home frustrated and did nothing but think of how horribly I had played at try outs.  The next day, although I was still angry, I realized that I really love golf and I only played badly one time; unfortunately, it just happened to be at try outs.  I still wanted to play, so I went back outside to start practicing again.

I am back to normal now, playing well and without nerves. I still practice golf because it is my favorite spring, summer, and fall sport along with skiing, my winter passion.  I’ve played in numerous area tournaments now and have done well against my average, but haven’t won one yet.  That day will come, just have to keep chipping away – see what I did there? 😉

Golf As A Tool For Communication

Golf As A Tool For Communication

I play golf at least twice a week for the duration of the summer.  Golf is my favorite game and I communicate through my actions on the course.  First, I must call in and make a tee-time.  The tee-time says that I will be playing golf at a specific time, on a specific date that I choose.  Once I make the tee-time, I am responsible for showing up on time to play, or cancelling one day in advance if I will not be able to make it.  When I show up at the tee, I am usually paired up with three random strangers.  Immediately, I introduce myself to everyone I am playing with to show that I am open to conversation during the round.  While we play, I chat with my fellow golfers.  I usually learn a great deal about the people I play with.  They talk about their jobs, their families, and life in general.  Although I learn a lot by speaking with the other golfers, I learn even more by how they act during the round.

Golf is a game of etiquette. Golf etiquette is used not only to protect the golf course and golf equipment, but also to allow golfers to have a safe and enjoyable time.  Basically, there are rules and guidelines on how to play the game and what a golfer can and cannot do.  Since there are hundreds of rules and guidelines that golfers must follow, I will give my two favorite examples.  The first example of proper etiquette is not speaking during a golfer’s swing.  This simple rule is based on common courtesy.  I never speak during a golfer’s swing because it is very disrespectful and reflects poorly on me.  The second example of proper etiquette is replacing any divots that you make during play.  Any time I hit a golf ball with an iron in my bag, I take a divot out of the ground.  By replacing the divots I take out, I am repairing the course and allowing other golfers to enjoy the game as much as I do.  These simple examples of proper etiquette tell other golfers that I am both respectful and courteous, among other things.

I have learned a lot on the golf course that I can take with me into the business world after I graduate from college.  Since I began playing golf, I have become more outgoing and have learned many life lessons.  I have gained a plethora of knowledge and have greatly improved my social skills by making a conscious effort to converse with golfers as we play.  I have enforced the importance of showing respect to everyone and everything.  I have learned that you cannot succeed unless you continue to try again and again, even when you fail.  Finally, I have learned that you can’t always play your best, but you can always act your best.  Golf has made me a better person, and I will carry my newly gained knowledge with me into the future as I search for a job and make a life for myself.  Golf is my greatest tool for communication and I will continue to play it until I can no longer walk.